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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
turecamo, our man in paris. >> reporter: the latest craze in french dining. hamburger. yeah, the french used to think they were an american scourge: food without flavor or finesse. but they're beginning to see that even a hamburger can be gourmet. i mean just ask victor. he created a restaurant dedicated to the gourmet burger. he did his research criss-crossing america. >> i started in los angeles with a backpack. my only goal was to eat hamburgers. >> reporter: he had been open for a month and the wait for a table was 30 to 45 minutes. then there's another restaurant, a smoking truck. the first gourmet food truck ever in paris. the waiting time here? we're talking about a hamburger. the truck is the brain child of chris ten frederick from l.a. >> i tried to get the most authentic american burger possible. >> reporter: and the french find guilty pleasure eating with their hands. so what makes them gourmet? well, victor worked with an artisan butcher in paris. together they developed >> to get the perfect patty. reporter: chris ten studied french cuisine in paris for several years before
arrives in paris, the master who was already there, robert livingston who was approached, and he says essentially, how would you guys like to buy the entire territory of louisiana. livingston, it's not surprising, he said, yes, let's do this. they negotiate. the embassy arrives, complete the negotiation. >> host: that's james monroe. >> guest: who would become madison's secretary of state, and then would become madison's success sore as president. we have in the room a bunch of people almost who -- who would be president or almost president or thoroughly evaluated. they complete the negotiations. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they have bigger problems than they have with the united states. they want the cash. >> host: louisiana was a white elephant. >> guest: they think that the united states gets louisiana. it's too far away, and they with too consumed to protect it. he says, amazingly, with the foresight that gives him the reputation for, you know, genius of mixed ethical quality, but remarkable intellectual abilities, a says a century from now, it could make them
a possibility so he lands in france and starts traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who is already there is napoleon's foreign minister and he says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory? it's not surprising he said yes let's do this. they negotiate, complete the negotiation, they are -- i'm sorry, james monroe so who would become madison secretary of state and would then become madison's successor as president so we have in the room a bunch of people who would almost be president, or almost president so monroe and nixon complete these evaluations and they are not difficult. the french really want to sell and they want the cash. >> host: and louisiana they decided -- >> guest: napoleon things one way or the other. they are too to protect it. he says amazingly with a sort of foresight that gives him some reputation for the genius of the intellectual ability from a century from now that might make it so possible no one can stand up to them. so they take the purchase back to the news arrives in boston and its federalist terri
the atlantic and lands in france in search traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there -- robert livingston's approach by talleyrand who is napoleon's foreign ministry and talleyrand comes to livingston says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory of louisiana? livingston, he's not exactly surprising that livingston said yes, let's do this. they complete the negotiations negotiations -- i'm sorry, james monroe. who would become madison secretary of state and with them become madison's successor as president? we have your in the room a bunch of people who were almost, who would be president or almost president so monroe completes the negotiations. they are not typical. the french really want to sell. sell. they have bigger problems with britain and they want the cash. >> host: louisiana they have decided -- >> guest: one way or another, it's too far away and he says amazingly it was for sidekick is in this reputation for genius of mixed ethical quality. a century from now it might be so powerful that no on
're not expecting anything in the way of precipitation. paris tomorrow evening. flurries as far south as wisconsin. the average first- aid of flurries in chicago has a starkly ban on or about october 31st. we have actually gotten past that. it is not nearly as windy as it has been in recent days. tonight clouds gather. northwest winds at 4 to 12. a light northwest wind. saturday extensive cloudiness. maybe a sprinkle or a brief shower. i will need a lot of sleep i am running the hot chocolate race this weekend. add hot chocolate will feel pretty good with these temperatures. time for today's trivia. who was the first president born an american citizen? a. george washington b. andrew jackson c. martin van buren the answer still to come this midday! ♪ ♪ ♪ pop goes the world ♪ ♪ it goes something like this ♪ [ female announcer ] pop in a whole new kind of clean with new tide pods... just one removes more stains than the 6 next leading pacs combined. pop in. stand out. time fore sports. an integral piece of the "bench mob" is staying in chicago. taj gibson signed a contr
of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 bucks -- books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the dutch federation. jefferson was not there. he did get his hands on a copy very quickly of the constitution. we e-mail the copy for him over in paris. he said, where is the bill of rights? the answer was, there is no bill of rights. every people on earth is untitled by nature -- entitled by nature to a constant -- to a bill of rights which protect them against their government. this foreshadowed a problem. george mason was one of the members of the virginia delegation. he had written the declaration of the rights for the state of virginia in 1776. it was a few months before jefferson wrote the declaration of independence. when the convention was over, mason, who was a member of the virginia delegation, was greeted would not sign the constitution. washington was -- was -- was a member of the virginia delegation, would not sign the co
journal" and the international "herald tribune" in hong kong, london, brussels, paris, atlanta and new york. he served as managing editor of the asian "wall street journal" and london bureau chief for the journal. he was a member of the team that won the distinguished business reporting award for articles about the sub-prime mortgage crisis and was also one of the reporters awarded the 2008 excellence in urban journalism award. he covered fannie and freddie for "the wall street journal" over the eventful years of 2004 to 2010, and now he has written a very insightful and instructive book, "the fateful history of fannie mae" which he will now discuss. we are delighted to have you here. [applause] >> thank you so much alex and thank you all for your interest in this topic. i think it's really appropriate that i present my book here, because they aei was so far in warning of the dangers of fannie and freddie. not the congress was really listening. [laughter] and it's a pleasure to be here and see so many people who kindly helped me over the years in my research, alex, tom, ed, tom staton,
and paris, we see the triumph of the developed world cities. but the success of the city in the developed world is nothing relative to what's happening in the developing world. we've recently reached that halfway point where more than half of humanity now lives in urbanized areas, and it's hard not to think on net that's a good thing. because when you compare those countries that are more than 50% to those less than 50% urbanized, the countries on average have income levels that are five times higher. gandhi famously said the growth of a nation depends not on its cities, but on its villages. with all due respect to the great man, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which too often remain mired in the poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almost all of its existence. it is the cities, it is bangalore, mumbai, it is delhi that are the places that are the pathways out of poverty into prosperity. they are the places that are the conduits, the channels across civilizations and continents and the place whe
or paris or korea, and you start pointing out that no, we're not as good, it will create a sense of maybe shaking the complacency, which i think is the first step. there is a complacency here that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence, don't view their own kids' plight as bad at all. and we need to create some awareness, i think, as john said, through information that this is a serious challenge for our country and it's, you sadly it's changing who we are as a nation and we're losing our competitive edge because of it as well. >> and this project under way, a really good one, and then also the common assessment to bring it right down to the kid level, how your child is doing in relation to these rigorous and we hope world class standards, will certainly give people information. at the same time, however, if you've got a smug suburban constituency and the teachers in those schools are also grumping that the politicians and the policymakers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum. >>
during the siege of paris, providing political and humanitarian support. >> coming up tonight an c-span an update an the fiscal cliff. first we hear from speaker boehner. later senate democrats explain what they are looking for in negotiations with republicans. house speaker john boehner told reporters there has been no progress in two weeks of discussions on the fiscal cliff. his comments came on the same day guide ner made rounds on capitol hill. this is ten minutes. >> good morning, everyone. the president has warned us about the dangers of going over the fiscal cliff. but his actions have not matched his public statements. members of his own party seem quite comfortable with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. on tuesday, we had productive conversation at the white house. despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the am
had been there for and what she had nurtured us for. >> narrator: the mission in paris was leaderless. someone needed to turn it around, pull it all together. mitt took over. >> he immediately starts kind of establishing himself as a leader within the church because there's a vacuum. >> narrator: those closest to him say the experience had changed him. >> he made a commitment to himself to work as hard. and i think part of that comes from that experience of going overseas and seeing other people, and having life-threatening experiences and deciding that you're going to-what you're going to make out of your life. and he decided he wanted to make the most he could out of his life, and worked as hard as he possibly could to do that. >> narrator: by the early 1980s, barry obama had left hawaii and his grandparents behind. now he was on the mainland, in los angeles, at occidental college. they called it oxy. >> he was the most casual, unpretentious, nicest guy. i mean, my indelible image of him was always in a hawaiian shirt, and some op shorts and flip-flops. i don't know that he had a lo
and paris h ilton to do a little bit more. it is common sense. many of them are literally saying, taxing more. they believe they have more to give. everybody in their situation needs to be asked to do a little bit more and the country would be better off. did lloyd blankfein say that the other day? the reality of the situation is shifting. i cannot think of a better situation than that. he is somebody you, in theory, understands economics. host: from the news conference, the president on the debt and entitlement reform. [video clip] >> we can shape a process where we look at tax reform, which i am eager to do. we can simplify our tax system. we can make it more efficient. a distorting effect on our economy. i believe we have to continue to take a serious look at how we inform -- reform our entitlements. health care costs continue to be the biggest driver of our deficits. host: there is a response from one of our viewers. democrats are more concerned with punishing successful people with tax code rather than growing revenue. how do you respond to that criticism? guest: i do not think that
'oreal paris in betancourt. >>> 42 minutes past the hour. bonnie schneider has the thanksgiving forecast. it's looking pretty good out there. isn't it, bonnie? >> it is. we're watching out for windy weather, alina. that holds true from bismarck to minneapolis. wind gusts could be as strong as 48 miles per hour. in parts offed in we're also facing snow. so blowing and drifting snow from areas of grand forks into fargo. it's going to be a little bit messy for your thanksgiving day travels. gusts will be climbing up to 45 miles per hour. elsewhere across the country, we're also tracking dense fog. so clouds on the ground from paducah, kentucky, cape girardeau, to memphis, tennessee. low clouds. i think it will improve by 9:00 am. if you are flying today -- many of you are trying to catch that early flight in time for your tirky. in minneapolis and soelt where we've had rain showers and low clouds. where it's not raining, millions of people will be out and about. new york city. the parade weather looks fantastic this year. bright sunshine and temperatures in the 40s. climbing into the low 50s fo
hurtphd in paris. and elizabeth lower-basch got her master's at harvard. william is an independent from massachusetts, you are on. caller: happy thanksgiving. i just want to know, what is poverty in america? what does that mean? host: we discussed that earlier. guest: $20,000 a year, $30,000, $50,000? are these companies sitting on millions of dollars? the governmentwhy are they sitts money when they could be hiring people? host: veronique de rugy, the figure that we decided on for a family of three? guest: $18,000 for a family of four. but a lot of the programs, the poverty programs -- and there are 126 different poverty programs, 22 different food programs, and people always assume there are a few. there are many of them. the eligibility depends on -- food stamps at the federal level are 30%, right? states can add to that number, so it really varies, your eligibility varies on the program, based on the federal standards, and the states once. host: would you like to address the caller's issues about u.s. corporations? guest: when we see surveys of companies, they are nervous about cons
because it is paris up of. -- because it is perishable. in the senate, cooler heads prevailed and they were able to construct a deal that included farm programs and nutrition programs. host: george tweets in and says -- guest: i think it is a steep fiscal slope, i do not think it is a cliff. we do not want to do that. if we saw unemployment go up 1.5 or two points, the deficit go back up, maybe the democrats would benefit and the republicans would get trounced in 2014. on the other hand, all of money and politics in the 24-hour media, who knows politically what would happen if that were the case? as a partisan i might agree with the caller, but as a patriot, i think we need to get this matter resolved. host: idaho, mark, an independent college. good morning, marc. welcome, you are on the air. caller: sorry. thanks for having me on. i had a quick comment. i think a lot of the hate and discontent going on in washington right now is being fuelled by our attention being misdirected or misplaced. the taxation side of the question is interesting, but is basically, who is going to pa
or paris or korea and you start pointing out that now, we are not as good, it will create a sense of maybe there is a complacent view that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence don't see their own kids life is not at all. we need to create some awareness that this is a serious challenge for our country and sadly is changing who we are as a nation where the singer could edit a page as well. >> a project underway, a really good one and also the common core assessments and how your child is doing in relation. we hope world-class standards. at the same time, however, got a smug, suburban constituents the end in the schools that are also grown in the policy makers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum, teaching to the test. you've got a complacent constituency in grumpy teachers. how does the reformer prevail? [laughter] >> well, you know, i think i mentioned this to you, we have to look at this new core of people coming into the profession and that kind of won't run in and dismissive t
to stay during the siege of paris, providing political and humanitarian support. sunday night debt 8:00 eastern on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: michael rich, chief correspondent with the national journal to talk about the latest on the benghazi attacks, susan rice, her possible nomination to be secretary of state. -- michael hirsch. she spoke with three senators about her nomination. guest: she had a meeting with john mccain, instagram, and kelly ayotte, all republicans who have been the chief skeptics about her potential nomination as secretary of state, almost entirely based on what they see as withholding or a distortion of information about the attack in benghazi on september 11 that cost the lives of the u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. -- john mccain, lindsey graham, and kelly ayotte. it is a meeting to try to appease your critics. after she came out of the meeting, it appeared to their opposition to them had increased. if the president intends to nominate susan rice as a successor to hillary clinton as secretary of state -- and most
on washburn during the franco war and the only diplomats to stay during the siege of paris, providing political and humanitarian support. "q&a", sunday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. [inaudible conversations] >> in mourning, and i would like to call this hearing of the house transportation and infrastructure committee to order. we are pleased to conduct the school committee oversight hearing on amtrak. the title is getting back on track. the review of amtrak's virtual reorganization. so welcome, and we have one panel of witnesses today. the order of business is i will provide an opening statement and provide background. i will introduce mr. elijah cummings and others who wish to be heard. then we will turn to our witnesses and we will hear from them and go to questions and i am pleased to welcome everyone this morning. >> this is one of a number that we have held forth in a series of committee hearings on amtrak and u.s. passenger rail power. we actually have two more scheduled. one will be on thursday, december 3, novel focus on high-speed and intercity passenger rail. the gra
diplomat to stay during the siege of paris. sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c- span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now is kim dixon, a tax policy correspondent for reuters. this is part of our series on the so-called fiscal cliff. today we're looking at the issue of the payroll tax cut. kim dixon, when did the payroll tax cuts issue come into effect? guest: about two years ago at this time. expiration of the bush-era tax cuts that began in 2001 were set to expire. republicans control the house. president obama wanted to continue them for everybody except those in the top 2% tax rate. --wasn't ended the year deal it was an end-of-the-year deal. the obama administration was looking for the stimulus measure. they thought it would be hard for republicans to oppose a tax cuts. host: the money rigidly was going where -- the money originally was going where? guest: going to the social security trust fund. it is still going there. it is still going to social security. the treasury is making up the money and still running the money, the discount that folks are getting other tax
, then you can go to paris proved pool of people who want to come into the job and they can come in and do the job for a certain amount of time. and then you have to offer that job again to someone, if an american worker does not want it, then you let come you give it to someone else. it's also in our enlightened self interest to cover his immigration reform. i would want to can encourage you to go to the council on foreign relations website and see the task force report. it was co-chaired by jeb bush and mac mcwhirter. that points out the country is going to lead the world in the 21st century economically is going to be the country that can amass the largest mass of brain power. no matter where it was born. to do its research in its country. we started off with a head start because we're a nation of immigrants. but their other countries that are competing with us. anybody who gets a ph.d and a hard science from american university. i don't care where they were born, we ought to staple a green card to their diploma. and encourage them to do the work here. if we want america to be a country
is on the education peace, -- piece, we found teaching the paris is critical. when i started, we had parents say my kids can go back in the game. you say, if your child cannot go back in the game. parents are now aware. they are not making those kinds of decisions. the other piece of it is on coach's training. we need to get the coaches out there to teach other coaches. we have to do a better job in the nation about the national structure. >> brooke, tell me about your web site. are you working with the nfl on an initiative? >> we are helping with the nfl evolution. each day you see tips from mom's team, which i am the publisher of. i am also the author of home team advantage, the critical role of mothers in youth sports. i have a great new hot. it is as the producer of a documentary around football i keep hearing these great pieces about parents. that team is the website iran. for the past 12 years, we have been leading the way in concussion education in youth sports. moms are very concerned. about nine months ago, received a letter from a mother in oklahoma. she wanted mom team to parachute in wi
. women we have a champion." paris jackson said "saying a prayer, thank you, god. and #, don'thavetomovetocanada. >> donald trump, the ever shrinking violet wrote "well, back to the drawing board." this is how celebrities are reacting. >> you got to love, i guess the cele celebro twitter board. >> yep, yep, there you go. >> there's a look at it as we go to a break and we will be back again with so much more as we know. the big speeches coming up. what a night this is. we'll be back. when we switched to fios, we got better tv, better phone, better internet. it was like somebody like took our computer, shook all the ju out of it. we're actually getting more for our money with fios. [ male announcer ] it's time to get more for your money. upgrade to veririzon fios internet, tv and phone with our best price online. just $84.99 a month, guaranteed for one year with no annual contract. there's at least three couters. [ girl 1 ] a tablet. [ woman 1 ] couple of gaming systems. we could all be running at the same time. we do not notice any dips. [ male announcer ] get tv rated #1 in c
. log on to foxbusiness.com/ -- foxnews.com/politics. jenna lee some girl in paris is getting really annoyed. >> megyn: are you kidding? loving it. >> that's true. >> megyn: bret baier. the twitter war between us in over. >> bret: it's over. >> megyn: i receive. >> bret: she won. minutes away from the battleground state of virginia closing, the commonwealth of virginia. let's bring back the panel. we have been focusing a lot, brit, about virginia. but as we talked about with charles, it's so much broader than that. what about what we're seeing about the electorate tonight and early, the turn out we're antidotally getting the turnout is high. we don't really know what the electorate looks like. >> bret: we also don't know, for example, where, for example, there is a high turnout in what had been democratic areas. whether those people are all going to vote for the democratic. normally that's a pretty good indication. this is an unusual year. we have seen unusual things all through this year. i think the thing to watch is the independents and how they break. and as we get more exit poll
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)